Tag Archives: water

More Rain!

My new rubber boots arrived today and none too soon.  Nearly every time i wore them this past year, my feet got wet.  (which was a lot because it has rain incessantly except for Sept and October so we had absolutely NO fall regrowth for winter stockpile pastures).  We are getting some Scottish weather albeit a bit colder.

The old ones are probably at least 12 years old and basically leak because they have cracked and dry rotted at the ankles where they bend.  LaCrosse brand has been my go-to for 30 plus years.   Hopefully, these new ones will last as long, but they do seem to be slightly less quality and a bit differently shaped in the foot.  Made in China – too bad.  But they fit nicely, so I am encouraged that they will live up to their historical quality.

Note how much taller the new ones are – that’s only because the heel on the old ones are just worn down!  They also appear wider in the leg, but that’s just because my old ones are trained to stay open to receive my foot.  Cheers! tauna

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Pluggin’ Away

We have been truly blessed to have splendid weather so far into the autumn season.  This has allowed a considerable amount of extra outdoor work to be accomplished – making up for the lack of such earlier in the year due to constant rain.

However, signs of winter are moving across the country, so it’s time to get serious about it.  We’ve been feeding some hay since it was nice and dry, but that seems to be past for a while, so back to grazing.  Too bad for deer hunters at all the rain this firearm season.

At all places, we’ll have set up two polywires across an ungrazed paddock ready for winter stockpile grazing.  With the warm weather, we’ve been able to keep the stock on paddocks with only a little regrowth, but that will soon change once the nighttime temperatures drop below freezing.  It’s important, too, to not graze too short this time of year unless you are purposefully doing so to ‘set back’ the existing grass and root system.

At my south Missouri farm, Dallas, Christian, and I worked nearly all daylight hours to set out hay bales for bale grazing, clearing brush, and building hi-tensile perimeter fence.

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We took a pickup with a Hydra Bed bale moving system to leave in south Missouri, so we packed carefully to get all our junk to fit in the boot and the back seat of the car for the return to north Missouri.
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To build that perimeter fence in south Missouri, I’m using this third wire from my existing fences up here.  This means, removing all the cotter clips from the post, then winding the wire back onto the spinning jenny.   Shown here is getting near to a 1/4 mile back onto the jenny.  Once our weather straightens out again, I’ll wind up another 1/4 mile, then a few more short pieces and that’s about all I can reasonably get on here.  It’s pretty darn heavy by that point and I’ll need help moving the spinning jenny loaded with that much wire.

Friday morning, however, we finished up and took some leisure time.  We don’t often do that.  Ziplining in the southwest Missouri Ozarks.  Branson Zipline  is an awesome place to go with great guides.  Fun time.  And, yes, even I stepped off the platform into a 100 foot freefall!

With cold weather coming, it’s time to address the livestock water tanks.  Allen sat down this morning to make a list of his tanks, which he’ll either shut off and drain or some he’ll turn on the leak valve and allow the water to run through the overflow pipe.  The moving water won’t freeze up.  He has 74 tanks to attend to while i only have 10!

Cheers!

tauna

 

 

 

Brush and Trash

Just two days before my sons and I left for Scotland on 12 September, our area received over 10 inches of rain in about 12 hours!  What a nightmare!  ALL of our watergaps were washed out and in some low lying areas, fences were laying almost flat to the ground.  My husband and Christian got to stay home and do all the cleanup.

With that in mind, it is time I try to keep some of the big dead logs and rotted stuff from being washed down into a massive water gap that is on the eastern edge of my farm.  This ditch catches all the water from my place plus a good deal of the runoff from the row crop farmers to the north as well as runoff from Cotton Road.  My southern neighbour’s property also has a good deal of runoff in this ditch, so it doesn’t take much of a rain to really get things rolling, but 10 inches in 12 hours is a mess!

Burning the rubbish that had been pushing on the perimeter fence.
Burning the rubbish that had been pushing on the perimeter fence.
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My new pup, Red Wolf, an Australian Shepherd from Scott and Jennifer Allen’s fine stock dogs. Red is about 4 months old. He is not obedient enough to be allowed to run without a long lead. He needs a lot of training, but he’s learning quickly. Lots of distractions in the timber and we are working close to a paved road.
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These White or Paper Birch, or whatever they are called are pretty rare in north Missouri, so I’ve taken extra time to prune them to encourage better growth. Don’t know if they really have any other value other than to be extremely pretty. These trees are staying! We are making considerable headway in clearing away rubbish from the creek (or ‘crick’ as we say in north Missouri).
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Old growth timber that needs a LOT of TLC. My Grandpa Falconer raised sows and pigs in this 20 acre timber patch for years. I plan to lamb out my ewes in here this spring.
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No, not really! my little Stihl 211C is not designed to take down a tree of this size and my skill level is not either!
Dallas standing by one of the trees that is too old and ugly to have any value.
Dallas standing by one of the trees that I’ve been told is too old and ugly to have any value.

Dallas and I have been working at clearing this week and since there are very few days in north Missouri that the wind lays enough to start brush fires, we coveyed up and set three today.  Although it was a bit nippy and no sun, working in the shelter of the timber with no wind the temperature was about perfect.

Preparing for a Cold Snap!

Cold temperatures have descended on north Missouri today and forecasted to hang around for at least the next 10 days! With the ground already frozen, these continued below freezing temps made

it tough to set up the sheep electric netting fence.  Thankfully, I put up netting around several large bales of hay and running water for the sheep to stay put until the weather breaks, though I may have to chop ice if we don’t get any snow.  Sheep really don’t need water if there is snow available.

No longer am I trying to graze the road banks with the sheep.  Moving them down the bank is like pushing water now and with the ground frozen, it’s far too difficult to install the Kencove sheep netting fence.  At this point, grazing the banks in the spring after green grass starts coming on will be the next time they are pushed out.  Sheep grazing the banks eliminates the need for me to mow the banks with the brush hog, but it is extra work.

Cattle are a different story in the water department.  If there is plenty of heavy, wet snow, they won’t drink much, but if that’s what we have, it destroys the stockpiled winter forage for them to graze much faster than just being frozen or a light snow.  However, with a light snow, they will need fresh flowing water available.  Therefore, in anticipation of freezing weather, I filled the water tank and opened the leak valve so that the water will fill the tank and then continue running over the top of the overflow pipe.  Flowing water will not freeze easily – especially if the cattle are drinking from it.  The drawback to overflow is that the water is draining the pond from which it originates, though in Missouri, this is usually refilled easily when spring rains come.

Winter grazing with the lack of grass regrowth allows us to strip graze whatever size breaks we want to give the cattle or sheep.  If I know I’ll be back up to the farm the next day, I’ll give the cows a very small break of forage so that they won’t walk all over it and ruin it before grazing.  However, if it will be several days or if it’s going to be extra cold, I’ll set up a bit larger break.  The breaks are fenced with one strand of Powerflex Fence electrified polybraid fence and step-in posts for easy set up and tear down.  I use two lines and leap frog them across the paddocks  – allowing enough quality forage to maintain a healthy condition on the animals.  Strip grazing versus free access will vastly increase utilisation resulting in, on average, about 60% more grazing days!  Additionally, manure is more evenly distributed across the paddock.  (my paddocks average about 20 acres each).  My cows and calves require about 6500 lbs of dry matter per day, so accurately estimating the amount of forage per acre is crucial, then I open up enough acres for the cows to graze however many number of days I want.

Happy Grazing!

tauna

Sheep bale grazing near a small patch of timber.
Sheep bale grazing near a small patch of timber.
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Going for the green!
Cattle grazing through snow  - strip grazing stockpiles forage
Cattle grazing through snow – strip grazing stockpiles forage

Ragweed and Weather Reign!

This week our area received up to 10 inches of rain in one night! Flood waters raged in the night and next day.   After two days, the waters are starting to recede back to their banks, but a lot is trapped in sloughs, oxbows, and drainage ditches.   ALL of our water gaps are gone – not just mangled – but gone!  The boys and I are leaving for Scotland on Sunday, so I’m thankful that husband Allen and right-hand man, Christian, will be hard at repair and rebuild.  They will have at least two weeks dedicated to repairing and rebuilding the water gaps, interior paddock fences and posts, cutting up trapped logs and trees and removing from culverts and fences. They’ll put up temporary fence up until they can get to all of the perimeter water gaps to keep cattle and sheep from getting out onto the roads and neighbour’s fields.  Many have compared this flash flood to one which occurred in 1946 – yes, this one is worse than the 1993 flooding!

My allergy prick test resulting in.. several grasses, trees, cattle, cats, molds, and, of course , ragweed stood far and away the worst.  After the prick testing, I could take Benadryl which I could not do for these previous five days which has resulted in being trapped in the house and sleeping very little due to such discomfort. Once my appointment was over, Allen (who had thankfully driven me to and from Columbia), took me out to the Olive Garden at which I took two old Benadryls I found in an obscure pocket of my purse. Within a few minutes, relief was on its way, and despite drinking three cups of coffee with lunch,  drowsiness crept in.   Allen took the wheel and within five minutes of leaving the restaurant, I was sawing logs and what seemed like two minutes later I awoke to us pulling into the Orscheln’s parking lot in Brookfield (2 hours actually). We had stopped in to pick up my script for a steroid to help get me caught up. I plan to sleep some more tonight because I feel pretty daggone good now! I won’t start the oral immunotherapy drops until after we return from our month in ragweed free Scotland.  How a healthy person can be so miserable for weeks on end is beyond me!