Tag Archives: cows

Calving Season Underway!

For the past 15 years or so, we’ve had our calving season start about 18 May through first week of July.  This worked pretty well, but since i have had scour problems the past two seasons, i was adamant about making changes, so i put the bulls in earlier.  Thankfully, despite the earlier and shorter breeding season, most cows got pregnant again.

Official calving season this year for me started 25 April, but already have 16 calves on the ground and up and running!  Weather has been pretty nice until today with temps only reaching 46F and it’s misty rain and mild wind.

Cheers!

tauna

Egg Nog

 

Another treat for an all liquid diet – this one hails from my good friend, Barb, who, along with her husband care for great cows which produce awesome milk from their nearly 100% grassfed diet.

1 quart milk (real, if possible)

4 egg yolks

1/3 cup sugar or 1/4 cup real honey

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/4 tsp vanilla

Heat milk to 160 degrees (about steaming)over medium heat.  Add one cup hot milk to egg yolks, then blend into the remaining milk.  Remain vigilant and/or whisk often to keep it from sticking and burning to the bottom of the pot.  Add sugar (or honey) and spices, then reheat.  This is great warm or cold.

As always, use organic, fresh, local whenever possible.

Jerry really likes this and it’s packed with calories and fat, which is important for him right now.  He warms up a cup of eggnog if he has trouble falling asleep or for brekkie in the morning with his softened cereal.

Cheers

tauna

Casady Honey Farm 

Welter Seed & Honey

Frontier Organic Spices

Green Hills Harvest

 

The Verdict

Just finished pregnancy checking a few cows, including my recip (recipient) cows.  Remember that 10 cows were implanted with Aberdeen-Angus embryos on the 24th and 25th of September.  The verdict:  of the ten, six are bred!  That is 60%!  Which is so exciting.  It sounds like a low percentage, but consider that these embryos were collected and frozen in Scotland on 17 March 2015, then shipped frozen in August to Los Angeles, passed through customs, then on to GENEX in Billings, Montana continuing to Trans-Ova in Chillicothe, MO.  Then thawed and implanted.  That’s a LOT of room for error.

These cows are scheduled to calve about 25 June 2016.  A lot can happen between now and then and even at calving and during the calf’s growing years.  So the risk continues.

Suffice it to say, i may have the most colourful recip cows in the county!

Embryos come from Dunlouise Angus in Forfar, Scotland.  The Corriente and Longhorn were bought a few years ago from Bart Albertson and Jeremia Markway and the Dexter/Angus from a neighbour.

Cheers!

tauna

D121 x Jipsey Earl
This Longhorn cow is carrying a D121 (dam) and Jipsey Earl calf.
E170 x Jipsey Earl (2)
This Corriente cow is carrying an E170 (dam) and Jipsey Earl baby.
E170 x Jipsey Earl (3)
This Angus/Dexter cross cow is pregnant with an E170 and Jipsey Earl calf.
E170x Jipsey Earl
Corriente cow carrying an E170 (dam) and Jipsey Earl calf.
K377xRed Native
Corriente Cow pregnant with a K77 (dam) and Red Native calf.
E170 x Jipsey Earl
Longhorn cow carrying an E170 (dam) and Jipsey Earl calf.
260B x Ohlde Linebred
Corriente cow carrying a 260B (dam) and Ohlde OCC Linebred 661L (Angus) calf.

 

Refuge Ministries

Quick trip to my farm to shift the cows across the road.

chores 002
Even though we are inside the Gator, still got my hunter orange so as to be more visible.

Yes, i was just there yesterday, but discovered that I had grossly overestimated the amount of forage the cows would have, so they had to be moved today.

Took Dallas with me just in case my temporary netting decided to take flight in our 33 mph gusting winds.  But all went well;  he wouldn’t have needed to go, but sure gave me extra peace of mind.  Taking out mineral,

chores 012
Always keep out mineral for cattle unless it’s just raining everyday.  We use Redmon Natural mineralised salt.  You may know the company as Real Salt.

shutting gates, and draining a water tank took us 55 minutes.  Driving up there and back takes 1 hour 15 minutes.  Obviously, I usually plan to spend more time up there to justify the trip.

Frying lumpia this afternoon in preparation for my monthly trip to Refuge Ministries in Mexico, MO.  

 

Cheers!

tauna

 

 

Blessed with Fine Weather!

We had a lovely couple inches of rain a couple weeks ago which settled the dust after about 7 weeks of nuthin’!  It was dry – and still is – but with warm weather, the grass actually has been squeaking out a bit of growth before the last of this nearly perfect weather gives way to the bitter iciness of winter.

So, we have not had to turn the cows and calves on to winter stockpile yet – we have fed a few bales of hay to stretch the stay on some of the paddocks simply for convenience.  Plus it’s dry enough to set out bales with the pickup, so it’s a nice time to feed hay.  Once the snow is blowing and it’s cold, snowy, icy, or slick, i would rather just leapfrog another stretch of polywire on the stockpile and let the cows go to grazing.

This is the perfect time to get stock tanks, pump houses, etc winterized.  Today, I removed my two marine-type batteries from the solar powered water pump.  Drained the pump, pressure tank, intake and out pipes as well as 4000 feet of 1 1/2 inch HDPE water pipe (not as hard as it sounds, just undo the end and it gravity drains itself), and removed the bottom screw from the filter from the pond to drain it.  Unplugged and shut off the pump, turned the solar panels off, shut down the door to my portable solar house and latched it, loaded the marine-type batteries (yeah, they are heavy  – ’bout 60 lbs a piece!) into the back of my Gator and it is all set for winter.  I store the charged batteries in our basement – don’t want them to drain and freeze – they cost about $140 each.

Allen and Dallas are replacing a half a quarter mile of perimeter barbed wire fence on my Buckman 80.  It was just getting too worn out to keep cows in with any peace of mind.  They set posts and stretched wire today and yesterday.  Rick helped yesterday.  Such a busy week, they hope to finish up on Monday.  Once the end posts settle a couple days, then they’ll stretch the wire.  I can help put on the clips.  Why don’t i help?  Honestly, i’m really not strong enough to do much except put on the clips.  If anything ever happens to my guys, I’ll have to hire my perimeter fencing done.

My to-do list today:

Go to my farm – It takes an hour and 10 minutes roundtrip, so a good part of the time is spent in traveling.  Once there, i moved a water tank, replaced an anchor and brace post on hi-tensile fence, pulled the fiberglass line posts and moved them.  I’m actually moving about 650 feet of existing 2-strand hi-tensile wire over a bit.  It just wasn’t working where i had built it four years ago.

Quick trip to Brookfield to buy nappies for Allen’s Aunt June – she is attending a baby shower saturday morning to which i’ll take her.  At 96, her eyesight and motor coordination isn’t what is used to be and she no longer drives.  Last week, i spent a few hours scrubbing her frig and freezer since it was not working properly and all the food had gone — well, totally nasty.  I discovered that the back of the freezer (inside) was frozen solid, so hoped that cleaning, vacuuming underneath and behind, as well as completely defrosting would fix the problem.  Thankfully it did.  I found a wooden bar to place beneath the front of the unit since it was leaning so far forward.  Maybe the doors were not getting shut completely to cause it to freeze up.

We were supposed to have sunny weather today, but that didn’t happen.  However, I’d already set Dallas to the task of caring for his lawnmower trailer with linseed oil and mineral spirits on Monday early afternoon.  After two days of curing, today would have been the second coat.  He had parked it in the barn last night because of the possibility of rain; only a heavy mist, but inside it is dry.  Maybe he’ll get that second coat on tomorrow.

Had planned to pain the letters on the Powell Seed Farm sign, but too high humidity and too cool.  Ran out of time anyway.

Made some phone calls.  One to get the lawnmower picked up for annual maintenance, another to Bill to schedule changing out June’s garbage disposal, amongst others. Received a phone call from the fellow in south Missouri from whom I’m buying hay and he has it all delivered, so will pay him tomorrow.

Well, that’s about it along with preparing beef fillets and stir fry for lunch, three loads of laundry, making up another batch of laundry soap, and washing dishes.  I had more on the to-do list, but tomorrow’s another opportunity.

CHeers!

tauna

The Sixth Day

Nearly here – weekly shabbat – so thankful our Creator made such for us.  Of all the 10 commandments, the fourth one is relatively easy to keep (remember) in our culture.  I’m tired!  Lack of sleep from allergies and just the constant fighting it makes my body exhausted all the time.  Keeps me from being productive to be sure.

Eleven cows of the seventeen selected have been recorded in standing heat as of 6pm today.  There are a more who are shoving and being restless, so they will likely come in sometime before tomorrow.

Other than going to town to pickup kleenexes, drop of some papers at NRCS, swing by the bank for a quick visit with Tom Morris about his grandparents being the last caretakers of the Linn County Rest Home, located just a mile west of Linneus on Infirmary Hill, then to Twin Oaks Produce for a handful of groceries.  Had a nice visit with Fran Graff, whose daughter is also teaching in Dubai, though at a different school than our daughter.

Rick continues to take care of my cows on the farm north and west of Purdin – It will another month before I can stay outside for more than a few minutes at a time.  Will my cows forget me!?

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna