Tag Archives: Corriente

Roadbank Grazing

Friday morning the plan was to fence off a portion of Cord Drive to let the cows in to graze the road banks.  Worked perfectly, except the cows had already had their brekkies, i guess ,and were really not interested in grazing!  Next time, i’ll put them on short pasture the night before, then they’ll be eager beavers.

They were mostly interested in watching me sit on the Gator and read my new book, Colorblind, by Amy C. Blake.

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Tools of the trade.

Shabbat Shalom!

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View from my ‘office’ window yesterday.
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Coming out of the pasture into the road.

The Unique Corriente – Overview

Reprinted from North American Corriente Association website.

Corriente Cattle
Corrientes are raised primarily for sports cattle, while preserving such natural attributes as high fertility, early maturity, trouble-free calving, and foraging efficiency, as well as disease and parasite resistance. This unique breed differs greatly in conformation, behavior and hardiness from cattle raised only for meat. Most of the production problems experienced by today’s cattlemen are a result of increasing size and weight in order to fit the current commodity market.  Corrientes remain untainted by the manipulative animal husbandry which has affected and weakened many domestic animals.
The Corriente is a small, agile, athletic animal with stamina, heavy horns, and a gentle disposition.  These characteristics make the Corriente an ideal animal for team roping, bulldogging and an excellent choice for cutting and team penning.

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Calf roping – While it may seem cruel to rope these calves – bear in mind that these calves are very well cared for throughout their lives. They ‘work’ for about 10 seconds every few nights until they are too big for roping or wrestling. Note the condition and health of the calf featured in this photo. Photo courtesy of North American Corriente Association.

New Blog Under Construction!

Corriente and Longhorn cows form the basis for grazing in the green hills of north central Missouri. Raised totally on grass with no added inputs other than salt and mineral, the Red Angus cross calves are developed for finishing on grass alone. Postings to this blog will include personal experiences – both good and bad – with faith, family, and farming. The hope is to share what we learn, challenge, and encourage others in all areas of life. Bear with me as I negotiate the learning curve of setting up a blog.