Tag Archives: strategic planning

Rural North Missouri

“Planning and strategizing are OK, but most of life is in the trenches. It’s just a lot of hard work, commitment and you’re never done.”   Tina Reichert, Brunswick, Missouri

Rural Missouri County Among Best Places To Grow Up For Future Income Growth

AUG 5, 2015
Brunswick street
Downtown Brunswick, Missouri

“Not-To-Do” List

Here is another thought from Burke Teichert, a man whom I’ve yet to meet, who has words of wisdom and experience worth pondering taken from his column “Strategic Planning for the Ranch” in Beef magazine.

“We can all think of things we used to do.  We quit doing them because we discovered they were not necessary –often long after they’d ceased to be necessary, if they were ever necessary in the first place.  I’ll guarantee most of us are still doing things that don’t need to be done, but cost us time and money.”

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves Inc.  He resides in Orem, Utah.  Contact him at burketei@comcast.com

What are some things you do that are time wasters?  I know i have some, but it seems like they come from poor planning rather than day to day wasting (although this blog may easily fall into that category, but I am hoping it will build into a business someday).  Questions i ask myself:  What am i doing right now?  Is it costing me time and money? or is it a good investment for my time and money?  If it is a cost, why am I doing it?  Sometimes we do things because we enjoy them and that’s okay IF we can afford it.  For example, if we have no debt, if we have some serious savings, and if we can easily live within our means.  But if we struggle with finances, we need to seriously slash those costs that yield no income.  Don’t fall into a trap of justifying anything.

Rust, Rot, Depreciate

Here is another thought from Burke Teichert, a man whom I’ve yet to meet, who has words of wisdom and experience worth pondering taken from his column “Strategic Planning for the Ranch” in Beef magazine”

Cut Overheads

“If it rusts, rots, or depreciates, you want as little of it as possible.  Think of ways to function with less labor, facilities, and equipment.  These decisions are often more emotional than rational.”

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves Inc.  He resides in Orem, Utah.  Contact him at burketei@comcast.com

Before purchasing something that will rot, rust, and depreciate, think hard about whether or not there is a better way to deal with an issue.
Before purchasing something that will rot, rust, and depreciate, think hard about whether or not there is a better way to deal with an issue.

Think Return per acre not Return per Cow

Mr Teichert is a cattle ranch consultant, so he thinks in terms of cows, but this thought can apply to most livestock and may even extend to orchards (think dwarf vs standard trees) and other horticulture schemes.  Here is another thought from a man whom I’ve yet to meet, who has words of wisdom and experience worth pondering taken from his column “Strategic Planning for the Ranch” in Beef magazine”

Think Return Per Acre Rather Than Return Per Cow

“We often get so caught up in “maximums” that we forget the distinct possibility that running more cows that are small and give less milk might provide a greater return per acre while producing less return per cow.  The calf-crop percentages might be greater, while cost per cow and cost per acre might both be significantly lower, which will greatly increase profit.  We want to improve the productivity and profitability of our entire ranch, not production or profit per cow.”

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves Inc.  He resides in Orem, Utah.  Contact him at burketei@comcast.com

Prioritize for Profit

When it’s ridiculously cold outside, sometimes it’s best to just sit and think (once all the work and chores are done).  Here is a thought from a man whom I’ve yet to meet, who has words of wisdom worth pondering taken from his column “Strategic Planning for the Ranch” in Beef magazine

Prioritize for profit rather than convenience.

Sometimes convenience and profit are closely related, other times, they aren’t related at all or may even be antagonistic.  Don’t let your desire for convenience get in the way of improving profit — unless, of course, you’re already profitable enough and convenience can add enough quality of life to offset foregone profit.”

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves Inc.  He resides in Orem, Utah.  Contact him at burketei@comcast.com