Tag Archives: seed

Bright Sunshine!

That forecasted rain hit about 9:30 pm and just poured for about 5 minutes – storm over.  The Mizzou game in Columbia, MO, however, looked like miseryfor a LONG time – it didn’t help that the hometown team lost badly.

Today dawned clear and bright and i managed to clean the frig, wash a load of laundry, feed the calves, wash windows, and start the oven cleaning before the day got started.

Paperwork has been gathered for my trip to Chillicothe in the afternoon to the license bureau.   Allen and I had planned to purchase the pickup through bartering, however, i found out at the license bureau that that can only be done throught a dealership!  No private transactions.  That doesn’t sound fair.  So, of course, i had to pay sales tax after all.  The inspection for the pickup resulted in a $600 repair bill!!

I took some photos of an old McCormick International seed drill that I listed for sale on Powell Seed Farm, Inc facebook page.  It is old and small by today’s standards, but it would be perfect for someone starting out or for use in grass paddock improvements.

Stopped in Meadville at my friend’s house and we had a serious heart to heart visit.  I cannot imagine going through life without a close friend with whom each can share our joys, concerns, and heartaches.

Slow late afternoon since i’d allowed plenty of time for the license bureau, yet i was in and out in less than half an hour!  Fed the calves, worked on my chicken tractor (this is my 9th design and build of chicken tractors and eggmobiles).  I’ve been at the chicken tractor for months, but it’s the lowest item on my priority list, so I seldom have time to piddle around with it.  Had hoped to have it done before i butcher our last 14 hens so as to see if it works, but that may not happen.  Might get chicks next spring, but might not.  I may just enjoy not having extra chores, but it’s fun building stuff – it just won’t get used.

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Next Day – Thursday

This morning, after chores, Dallas and I were to deliver clover seed to New Cambria Sale Barn.  The buyer couldn’t meet us at the predetermined time, however, so we were to just leave it there and he would pick it up later.  He had left the check with the lady who runs the sale barn cafe.  About a 35 minute drive over, so didn’t take long and I had a nice ride with my son.

Took a bit of time to prune landscaping.  Dallas has been pruning his grandpa’s cherry and apple trees.

Ashes 'helping.'
Ashes ‘helping.’

Early this morning, I had started making 6 lbs of sloppy joes and a batch of deviled eggs for the firemen’s meeting tonight. However, Allen received a text that said Alex would bring lasagna.  Hooray!  Nevertheless, I finished the batch and we’ll enjoy sloppy joes for a while, then I’ll freeze the rest for later.  The deviled eggs are quickly disappearing already.

After a stop at Orscheln’s to purchase more lamb milk replacer (will be glad when they are weaned onto creep feed!), we arrived

Ashes spying Midnight
Ashes spying Midnight
And finally, they had to start fighting.
And finally, they had to start fighting.

home in time to warm up lunch, then I headed up to the farm.  Odds and ends maintenance and repair on fence, water, taking out mineral to both cattle and sheep.  Also, made some plans to modify the corral in the shearing shed and gathered a few materials for that as well as doing some measuring.  Got home about 8pm.

Cheers!

tauna

The Next Day – Tuesday

After morning chores at home, including feeding and penning the dogs, letting out and feeding the chooks,  feeding all five orphan lambs and feeding and watering the two ewe with lambs which are in the barn, Dallas and i drove up to the farm to see what was happening.  Right off, I noticed a ewe having lambing difficulty, or so it seemed.  We gave her a bit more time before bothering her by enticing the mob of sheep into the corral.

The weather finally gave us a decent time to sort off the rams, so we did that, which went well.  Then we coaxed the 5 ewes with lambs out of the pasture (the ones Dallas had shut in a small area the night before) and gently and patiently walked them 1/4 mile down the road and across a wooden bridge to the corral, where all the other ewes and lambs had been gathered.  They hesitated at the bridge and of course, with baby lambs, it’s a slow process as the mommas struggle to keep track of their babies.  But all in all, it went very smoothly.

Then I headed over to check on that lambing ewe and the news was tragic.  As I reached inside, a really nasty smell eminated – yeah, the lambs were dead and had been for quite some time since all I could pull out was hooves, skin and body parts.  She had never dilated, so there was no way these could be delivered.  Hoping I could at least save the ewe, I continued trying to pull the dead lambs out, however, she shortly went into shock and died.

Now to head home to hook onto the little trailer, muster the yearling ewes from the Lamme farm, load and haul them out to the older sheep.  Gathering them out of the pasture and loading also went very smoothly.  We unloaded them, let all the other ewes and lambs out of the corral and into the pasture.  By this time, I’d decided to take the unloving ewe home, along with her lambs figuring I could work with them better.  So we loaded her and the two lambs in the front section and the three rams behind and off we went.

Thankfully, by the end of the day, this ewe accepted her two lambs!
Thankfully, by the end of the day, this ewe accepted her two lambs!

Since my hands and clothes were completely nasty, Dallas dropped me off to shower before I fixed lunch while he unloaded the rams at the Lamme Farm.  He brought the ewe and lambs back and parked the trailer in the shade.  I’ll deal with them later.

  •  After lunch, it was time to feed the orphaned lambs again before heading to the seed plant to mix grass seed for my spring broadcast seeding projects. Allen showed Dallas and me how to weigh out, mix, bag, and sew up.  Dallas had already attached the seeder onto one of the four wheelers, so after mixing up six bags of seed, we cleaned up and called it done for the day.
    IMG_20150310_153346
    Dallas weighing each variety of grass or legume to be mixed.

    Dumping in the weighed and measured grass mixture
    Dumping in the weighed and measured grass mixture
Mixing in the old cement mixer.
Mixing in the old cement mixer.

I went back up to check ewes one more time before dark and, unfortunately had to bring in three more abandoned lambs.  What is going on!?

Cheers!

Sacking it off, then the sack will be sewn up before loading for transport to the field.
Sacking it off, then the sack will be sewn up before loading for transport to the field.

tauna