Tag Archives: Missouri

Stuck In the House

What does a woman do when she is stuck inside due to extreme ragweed allergies!?  It is frustrating because the weather is starting to cool off and there is always SO much to be done outside.  Fences need repair, brush needs cutting, barns cleaned out, livestock needs shifting to new paddocks…… the list is endless.  Up until this year, youngest son, Nathan, would do my basic chores (shifting livestock, checking water) from mid-August to mid-October, but he is off to uni this fall, so the task has fallen to Rick, our new hand whom we hope stays on to become manager – he is certainly capable.  So, while I’m grateful,it’s frustrating as well.

So, after spending most of last week at my farm in south Missouri (Dallas and I were hoping our allergies would be somewhat alleviated, and surprisingly for me, i did find some relief, not so much for Dallas) and redesigning and setting up the working corral and trampling through a ‘jungle’ of a small timber patch to string out some polywire in preparation for fencing it off this winter and we started tearing out an old house, but wrong time of the year for that – i got stung on my upper lip just straight away.  OUCH!  brought tears to my eyes!

monday 002
Built up dust on the leading edges of ceiling fan blades.

This week, we are back home, so my major goal is to ‘fall’ clean the house.  Spiders have built webs in every nook and cranny inside and out, so lots of vacuuming and dusting.  Of course, I vacuum all the furniture; under and around the arms and cushions, and turn them over to vacuum the dirt and dust from underneath.  Cobwebs in the corners, from ceiling to walls, and walls to floors.  Climbing a ladder to wash off the center and blades of our two ceiling fans and dusting the leaves of our one inside plant.  Dusting the tops and back of wall photos and pictures, top of furniture, and all the wooden trim and doors.  And definitely under the floor grates which cover the return air ducts.

Cobwebs everywhere!
Cobwebs everywhere!

One tip I learnt as a travel consultant when on Fams and checking hotel rooms, was to run your finger along the top of doors and/or shower rods.  If there is dust, then the room is NOT clean.

Washing windows is sort of an outdoor job, so I can only do so much of that at a time before becoming overwhelmed with allergy attack.  But i can plug away at it.

Additionally, Monday i listed a bunch of unneeded items to sell on Ebay, paid bills, and RIck and i pulled the CIDRs, administered Estrumate, applied heat detection patches, and mouthed a few of the 17 recip cows because the needed ear tags and i didn’t know how old they were.  The ear tag number starts with the year they were born.  For example, a four year old cow’s number would start with a ‘1.’  This took about an hour, so i was struggling a bit by the time i could get back into the a/c.  Took a break, then went back out to let out the cows into the pasture south of our house for observing and ran water for them.

Of course, breakfast, lunch, and supper preparations are everyday.

Froze up a couple gallons of green beans, cooked down, slipped off the skins, and froze a gallon of tomatoes.

Until tomorrow!

tauna

Climbed up in the back of my Gator to drill a hole large enough for this solar lantern to fit snugly into.  When it's really dark outside, I can't even find our own driveway!  Hopefully this will help.
Climbed up in the back of my Gator to drill a hole large enough for this solar lantern to fit snugly into.  When it’s really dark outside, I can’t even find our own driveway!  Hopefully this will help.

Moving across the Road!

Yesterday started early since my ewe lambs needed loading from our corral to the paddocks they will stay in for grazing.  I’d never loaded sheep out here before, so hadn’t a clue how it would go.  Incredibly, it went very smoothly!  They hopped right into the trailer and off we went.  They were hungry to be sure since they went straight to grazing once out of the trailer.

Then Dallas and I loaded a bit of hay in my little trailer pulled by the Gator, loaded necessary supplies, and fueled up.  Arriving at Tannachton Farm 35 minutes later, we unloaded the hay and checked on the ewe that had been entangled in the fence.  She is still alive and we cared for her best we could, but time will tell if she’ll ever get up again.  At least it was warm yesterday, but snow today!.

We set up a bit over a quarter of a mile of single strand polywire on the Bowyer Place and hung a Parmak energizer to fire it up, all the while calling the cows, so they would be up waiting and ready to move.  We then set up the crossing for the move across Cord Drive.  Amazingly, the cows and calves poured across the road to fresh grass.  I was short some Stafix step-in posts for the polywire, so once the cows were moved across and in the lot, we drove back to where some stored posts.  As we were collecting those, I noticed a black cow north of the timber, so once done, we circled ’round to check.  What a wonderful surprise!  Not just one cow having calved, but THREE right there together.  They had wisely selected a south-facing, gentle slope with good drainage.  Of course, we left them alone – I’ll move them later when their calves are older and well-bonded to their mommas.

My photo is misleading – we do not have grass that green right now and the cows were actually moving the other direction!  However, I didn’t have any time to take photos so this one is stolen from last spring.

Got done and headed back home arriving about 1pm.  Just in time to finish the meal for our departure at 4pm to Mexico, Missouri and Refuge Ministries.  Despite having some cooking disasters, I managed to show up with enough edible tucker to serve about 70 people!  Chicken-Rice-Vegetable casserole with cherry cobbler and pumpkin bread.  And, of course, sliced cucumbers with home-made ranch dressing.