Tag Archives: lamb

Sabbath Day Devotion – Kit Pharo

Sabbath Day Devotion

April 8, 2017

Was Jesus a Vegetarian?

I had someone ask me if Jesus was a vegetarian.   That is a question I have never thought much about.   Apparently there are some in the vegan world promoting this concept.
Answer: Jesus was not a vegetarian.   The Bible records Jesus eating fish in Luke 24:42-43.   In Luke 22:7-15, we are told that Jesus ate the Passover meal with his disciples.   This meal included the Passover lamb.

I would like to say that Jesus was a big beef eater, but I cannot find any scriptures to support that way of thinking.   However, when Jesus tells the parable of the prodigal son in Luke 15:11-32, he said the “father killed the fattened calf” to celebrate the return of his son.

After the flood, God gave mankind permission to eat meat (Genesis 9:1-3).   God has never rescinded this permission.

With that said… there is nothing wrong with a Christian being a vegetarian.   The Bible does not command us to eat meat.   The Bible does say, though, that we should not force our convictions about this issue on other people or judge them by what they eat or do not eat (Romans 14:1-3).

Don’t just GO to church; BE the Church

Kit Pharo

Pharo Cattle Company

Cheyenne Wells, CO

Phone: 1-800-311-0995

Email: Kit@PharoCattle.com

Website: www.PharoCattle.com

 

Garlic Burger Buns

Lunch today is easy:

Roast bone-in square cut lamb shoulder from home raised sheep

Cubed butternut squash sauteed in butter from grassfed cows

Garlic Burger Buns – homemade with organic ingredients – today i made 12 buns with the same recipe – plenty big.

Recipe from page 39 Kathy Casey Cooks cookbook  – chef on the American Queen Steamboat

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Garlic Burger Buns

Makes 6-12 buns

1/2 cup milk

1 tbsp olive oil

2 tbsp sugar

1/3 cup warm water (90°F to 110°F)

1 package dry yeast (2 1/4 tsp)

2 eggs

3 cups all-purpose flour

3/4 tsp salt

1 tbsp finely minced garlic

Coarse ground salt for sprinkling

In a small bowl stir together the milk, olive, oil, sugar, warm water, and yeast.  Stir to dissolve yeast and let sit about 10 minutes then pour into a large mixer bowl.

Whisk the eggs in a small bowl and add all but 1 tbsp. to the liquid ingredients, reserving the extra for brushing the bun tops.  Mix in flour, salt, and garlic with paddle attachment until incorporated and then change to a dough hook.  Mix with dough hook on medium speed for about 3 to 4 minutes, as needed, to make a smooth, moist dough.  Knead until smooth.  Place in a large greased bowl, cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 1/2 hours.

Punch down and divde dough into 6 pieces.  Roll into balls and let rest 10 minutes covered with a towel.  With a well-floured rolling pin, roll balls into 4-inch rounds.  Place on a greased baking sheet.  Cover lightly with a towel and let rise until almost doubled.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F.

In a small bowl, whisk remaining egg together with 1/2 tbsp water.  Brush the tops of the buns lightly with egg wash, sprinkle lightly with coarse ground salt and place in overn.

Bake about 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown.  Cool buns on a rack.

That’s the recipe, but i usually make 8 buns with this r

 

Buying Beef or Lamb From the Farmer

There are many articles out there addressing this and to be sure, each producer may do things just a bit different, so please don’t take this article as the end all for ‘how to purchase beef from a farmer.’  This is what we do.

Step by step.

  1. If it is important to you, ask questions or visit the producer’s website (if they have one – many don’t,  we are producers not techies or salesmen) about how the animals are handled and raised.

Sample Question:

  1. Are the beeves you sell fully grass finished or grain finished (feedlot) do they receive grain on pasture? If so, is the grain non-GMO?
  2. Do you vaccinate your animals?  Are the animals you sell to me treated with antibiotics, synthetic dewormers, hormonal implants,
  3. Is your farm and animals raised organically?  certified organic (3rd party certification)?, (Certified organic animals/meat must be processed in a certified organic abattoir, all this adds tremendously to the cost of certified organic but doesn’t necessarily mean it’s better than your local producer.)  For example, many of us raise fully grass-fed and finished from conception to consumption, no implants, no synthetic dewormers, no antibiotics, etc, etc.  But, we might treat some brush in the next paddock with weed killer, so no way can that animal be certified organic.  Also, even if our farm and animals could be certified organic, if there isn’t a certified organic butcher shop, the meat cannot be certified organic.  I would have to make a 4 hour one way drive to a certified organic butcher.  Not going to happen.
  4. Why can’t i just ring up and you have a beef available?  Don’t you keep cattle year round?  Yes, we keep cattle year round, but most of us are cow/calf producers and will only finish enough animals to fill orders placed six months or more in advance.  Once an animal is finished, it needs to go to slaughter – every day that it is still on pasture, it is losing money.   Most of our animals are sold as calves through traditional markets, so if you haven’t ordered a beef well in advance, we won’t have saved back enough beeves to finish one for you.  Also, sometimes the weather plays havoc with finishing times as well.  If you want factory finished feedlot beef, you’ll have to go the store.

You may want to visit the farm before making a purchase, but remember, we are producers, not salesmen – if you aren’t serious about making a purchase, please don’t take up too much time.  Be prepared ahead of time with questions.  You may decide after you meet with the farmer and see how he operates, not to purchase, but don’t take up time just out of curiosity.

If you decide to purchase, already have it in your mind how much you want to buy.  For example, a typically grass-finished carcass will weigh 600-700 lbs.  Be sure to ask the producer, his might be bigger or smaller, but armed with that information, you can quickly determine whether you need a whole, half, or quarter carcass AND you can budget for it.  Be prepared that the carcass may be larger than the producer says – we cannot guarantee an exact hanging weight.  We are just not that good.  We can usually get within 50 lbs more or less.  Quarter carcasses are more likely sold as a split side rather than a hind or fore quarter, but ask; some producers sell both ways.  Half and quarter (split side) will be more expensive – Why?  because we have to find another buyer(s).

So, figure out  how much  meat your family will eat in a year or 6 months.  Most of us only offer beeves once or twice a year since it is time consuming to sell directly to the consumer, however, we are happy to do so if you are serious about quality meat for your family – we share that vision with you.

For a rough figuring, say your family eats 2 lbs of beef per day.  A whole beef of 600 lbs carcass will yield about 360 lbs of packaged meat.  If you want enough for a year – buy two beeves.  You must let the producer know at least 3-4 months in advance so he can keep the animal for you on pasture plus have it booked in at the butcher.  Many local butchers shut down for deer season, which means all domestic animals have to be butchered, hung, and out by 1 October.  They won’t take more in until the first of December, so it is critical to let the producer know well in advance if you want any.  Spring time purchases can be just as critical because so many people want to get animals in.

Once you’ve settled on a price (this will vary a LOT), then you may be expected to make a down payment to hold your beef.  This is reasonable.  Kind of like making a down payment on a vacation trip or anything else you’ve spoken for to do in the future.  Most of the time, you will pay the producer for the beef and the butcher for the processing.  Our processor charges 44 cents per pound hanging weight for basic processing and $30 as a kill fee.  But, i will tell you, that he charges less than most places and certainly less than a USDA inspected plant.  If you want extras like burger patties, extra tenderizing, excessive deboning, or other specialties, these will be an additional cost.  Work that out with the butcher.  Your producer will give you the contact information.

Retail Beef Cuts – most butchers are glad to help you with your custom order, but do a bit of study ahead to make best choices.  Also, remember, local butchers aren’t going to be into fancy, exotic cuts, so ask about special cuts, but you may not get exactly what you want.  You’ll also be asked how thick you want steaks cut and how many to a package, what size roasts and what kind.  Deboned or bone-in.  (i personally like a lot of bone – makes a ton of soup stock or treats for your dog, however, i always get my rump roasts deboned because i make corned beef with them).  How many lbs of burger in a package (1 or 2)?  Organ meats?, Suet?  These are just a sampling.

The butcher will tell you when the animal will be taken in to the butcher and it will likely be killed that day.  If you want organ meats, you MUST notify the butcher in advance!  Don’t forget this.  It is not the producers responsibility to tell the butcher how you want your animal custom processed.  If you don’t notify him, it will probably be thrown away, after which it cannot be salvaged.  If you wait until after the calf is delivered to call the butcher, do so as soon as possible.  Don’t make the butcher track you down and keep them waiting on how to process your calf.  This is not polite.

The producer will likely notify you within a day of the weight of the animal and what you own him.  The animal is yours now and has your name on it, pay him promptly!

Once the butcher calls you that the beef (or lamb) is ready for pickup, GO GET IT!  Some butchers may start charging storage if you leave it for long.  Just go get it and pay him for goodness sake.

How Much Freezer Space?  Allow 20 lb per cubic foot.  That’s packing it in there, though, and won’t be handy for sorting and finding what you need.  It will keep better in a chest type freezer kept near 0ºF versus your frig freezer or even a stand up freezer.  A stand up freezer certainly takes less floor space, but the chest type is typically more energy efficient as well.

What breed?  Some breeds are naturally more lean than others, but if it’s in the feedlot on a high grain diet, it’s gonna be fat regardless if it’s Corriente or Angus.  On grass, the genetics of the animal will be more expressed, but by and large, the producer will take the animal to a determined end point.  Grass finished will generally have less cover and internal fat that grain finished.

Hope this helps!  Do some online googling and research – there are loads of info out there.  Don’t assume the producer is producing in such manner that is important to you.  Don’t complain about the price or the lack of availability.  If you think a producer is too expensive, just shop elsewhere – don’t complain about it.

Moussaka for Lunch

Today started out with me castrating about 25 ram lambs.  Thankfully, Dallas and Rick caught and held them for me – MUCH easier to have extra hands.  To castrate lambs, one catches them up and holds their hind legs up to their front legs thereby the testicles are easy to grab hold of.  The handler is holding the ram on his lap.  I assured Rick I’d never missed before.  I think i scared him a bit!   😉  (I did NOT use my teeth!)   We also dewormed all the lambs as well as the ewes.  That will help clean them up and get them gaining well before selling the lot on September 7 at Kirksville Livestock Auction at the special sheep sale that day.  After selling off 54 lambs, 80 ewes, and 2 mature rams on Monday, we counted out about 51 lambs and and 52 ewes to sell the 7th, then I’ll be out of the sheep business.

This afternoon, I’m doing the washing and will clean up and around the barns in preparation for semen checking the bulls tomorrow and hauling out to the cows.

Moussaka” is an Arabic word and a popular dish in many Middle Eastern countries, the immortal eggplant-and-lamb casserole is generally credited to the Greeks, who claim it as a national treasure.  This recipe provides 8-10 servings.

1 large eggplant (or about 2 lbs)

2 tablespoons butter

1 1/2 to 2 lbs ground lamb

1 medium onion, chopped

1 can (15 ounces) tomato sauce

3/4 cup red wine or beef broth

1 tablespoon snipped parsley

2 teaspoons salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmet

White Sauce (see recipe)

1 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2/3 cup dry bread crumbs

1 egg, beaten

Tomato Sauce (see recipe)

Cut unpared eggplant crosswise into 1/2-inch slices.  COok slices in small amount boiling, salted water (1/2 teaspoon salt to 1 cup water) until tender, 5 to 8 minutes.  Drain.  Heat butter in 12-inch deep skillet until melted.  Cook and stir lamb and onion until lamb is light brown: drain.  Stir in tomato sauce, wine, parsley, salt, pepper, and nutmeg.  Cook uncovered over medium heat until half the the liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes.  Prepare White Sauce.

Stir 2/3 cup of the cheese, 1/3 cup of the bread crumbs and the egg into meat mixture; remove from heat.  Sprinkle remaining bread crumbs evenly in greased oblong baking dish 13 1/2 x 9 x 2 inches.  Arrange half the eggplant slices in baking dish; cover with meat mixture.  Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of the remaining cheese over meat mixture; top with remaining eggplant slices.  Pour White Sauce over mixture; sprinkle with remaining cheese.  Cook uncovered in 375ºF oven 45 minutes.  Prepare Tomato Sauce.  Let moussaka stand 20 minutes before serving.  Cut into squares; serve with Tomato Sauce.

White Sauce

1/4 cup butter

1/4 cup all-purpose unbleached flour

3/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

2 cups milk

2 eggs, slightly beaten

Heat butter over low heat until melted.  Blend in flour, salt, and nutmeg.  Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until smooth and bubbly; remove from heat.  Stir in milk.  Heat to boiling, sitrring constantly.  Boil and stir 1 minute.  Gradually stir at least 1/4 of the hot mixture into eggs.  Blend into hot mixture in pan.

Tomato Sauce

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1 clove garlic, finly chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 cups chopped ripe tomatoes

1/2 cup water

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon dried basil leaves

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 bay leaf, crushed

1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste

Cook and stir onion and garlic in oil in 3-quart saucepan over medium heat until onoion is tender.  Add remaining ingredients except tomato paste.  Heat to boiling, stirring constantly; reduce heat.  Simmer uncovered until thickened, about 30 minutes.  Stir in tomato paste.  (Add 2 to 3 tablespoons water if necessary for desired consistency.

PERSONAL NOTES:

I use organic grassfed milk, eggs, and butter.  Freshly grated Parmesan cheese and locally and organically grown tomatoes for sauces.  You can buy organic tomatoes and paste in the stores.  Thankfully, between what we raise ourselves and what i can purchase, it is all local and/or organic.  Flavours are much better.

Calve in Sync with Nature

Here is another thought from Burke Teichert, a man whom I’ve yet to meet, who has words of wisdom and experience worth pondering taken from his column “Strategic Planning for the Ranch” in Beef magazine”  Although, this one seems a no-brainer and has been promoted and taught by the late Dr Dick Diven, very few of us have embraced the concept.

Calve In Sync with Nature

“This may do more to reduce cost and increase profit than any other one thing.”

Burke Teichert, a consultant on strategic planning for ranches, retired in 2010 as vice president and general manager of AgReserves Inc.  He resides in Orem, Utah.  Contact him at burketei@comcast.com

We switched to late spring/early summer calving back in the late 90’s after attending one of Dr Diven’s Low Cost Cow Calf 3-day schools.  Quality of life for both man and beast shot through the roof!

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How much nicer to calve and lamb when the sun is warm and the grass is green and growing than in a blizzard, snow, frozen ground, and cold.

Refuge in October

Once a month, on a Wednesday (except in the summer), I make the meal for Refuge Ministries of Mexico, Missouri.  Each fall, there is a new set of faces and enthusiasm as the fifth graders from last year have moved into junior high and are now old enough to attend.  Lots of catching up to do amongst the ‘ladies in the kitchen’ from my summer hiatus.  Attendance dips a bit in the summer and I get terribly busy with farm work, so my contribution is about 8 months of the year.

The changes in some of these young peoples’ lives are subtle in some cases and drastic in others as they learn about God (Yahweh) and how He can use broken lives for His good through repentance and redemption.  For some, this weekly gathering of strong Christian volunteers are the only parental-like mentorship they have in their lives.  These volunteers are real heroes as they uplift and teach these, oftentimes, rowdy and rambunctious young people, week after week.

I’ve taken to starting the meal the day before since I get so worn out now if I try preparing all day then making the drive, serving, then drive home.  My son, Nathan and friend, Christian, leave at 4pm for Mexico, MO and return about midnight.  So, Tuesday I mixed up, rolled out, and cut 9 batches of egg noodle and stuck them in the freezer.   Since I didn’t have any sausage, I had set out 7 lbs of ground beef to thaw, then added 1/2 cup of sage, 1/4 cup black pepper, and 1/4 cup Real salt, then mixed that well (in two batches) in my Kitchenaid mixer.  Then set the whole thing in the frig overnight for the flavours to meld and it passed muster with enthusiasm, except my husband, who deemed it too ‘peppery.’  I may back off the black pepper just a bit next time.  I used spinach for my recipe today and adjusted the amounts to feed about 60 people.

Egg Noodles w/Sausage & Kale*

INGREDIENTS:

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 lb lamb or beef sausage

1/2 lb kale, tough stems and centre ribs discarded and leaves coarsely chopped

1/2 lb egg noodles

2/3 cup water

1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

DIRECTIONS: Heat oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then cook sausage, breaking up any lumps with a spoon, until browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Meanwhile, blanch kale in a 6-quart pot of boiling salted water, uncovered, 5 minutes. Remove kale with a large slotted spoon, drain over pan, and add to cooked sausage in skillet. Saute stirring frequently and scraping up any brown bits from bottom of skillet. Return cooking water in pot to boil and cook egg noodles in boiling water, uncovered, until al dente. Add noodles to skillet with a slotted spoon and 1/2 cup reserved cooking water if necessary, tossing until combined. Stir in cheese and thin with additional cooking water in desired. Serve immediately, with additional cheese on the side. Serves 6.  Lettuce or other greens can take the place of kale. Hint: Retain some of the cooking water and add to any leftovers for easier warming up. As always, use eggs (for making noodles) from pastured hens and sausage from grass-finished animals for best nutrition and flavour. Grow your own or buy the greens from your neighbour. *adapted from recipe in the March 2006 Gourmet magazine.

Egg Noodles

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups unbleached white or whole wheat flour

3 egg yolks

1 egg

2 teaspoons salt

1/4 to 1/2 cup water

DIRECTIONS:

Make a well in centre of flour. Add egg yolks, egg, and salt; mix thoroughly . Mix in water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until dough is stiff but easy to roll.  Divide dough into 4 equal parts. Roll dough, one part at a time, into nearly paper-thin rectangle on well-floured surface. Cut into narrow strips with a knife or noodle cutter.  Shake out strips and place on towel until stiff and dry, about 2 hours. Or I just drop the individual fresh noodles directly into boiling water.   Cook in 3 quarts boiling salted water (1 tablespoon salt) until tender, 12 to 15 minutes; drain. About 6 cups noodles. Storage: after drying, noodles can be covered and stored no longer than 1 month.

Use these noodles for the Egg Noodles w/Sausage & Kale Recipe.

Shetland Islands 60 degrees North

The Shetland Islands  are a subarctic archipelago comprised of some 100 islands, of which only 16 are inhabited.  Sumburgh, at the very south tip has the main airport, and Lerwick, with the safe harbour and is the seat of Shetland Constituency of the Scottish Parliament, are both located on what is known as the Mainland.  The Mainland is 373 square miles, whilst the entire Shetland Islands is 567 square miles.  Animals associated with the Shetland Islands are the Shetland pony, Shetland sheep (for which I have a fondness since Jessica raised Shetland sheep for about six years before going off to uni), Shetland Sheep Dog, as well as pigs, geese, ducks, and chickens all having been naturally or purposefully selected for thousands of years to thrive in this rugged environment.  Norse and Scottish heritage blend seamlessly here and evidences of both are found in music, prose, and signage.  Fiddle playing is most associated with traditional Shetland music.  The average high in winter will be 45 and lows around 34F, whilst summers may top out about 62F and lows around 50.  Summer days are almost perpetual day, while the winter days are short indeed.  The wind blows about 12 miles per hour everyday with usually a bit of showers.  Average annual precipitation is 39 inches.

St, Ninian’s Isle is connected to the main Shetland Island by a tombolo, which is a narrow sand or gravel bar connecting two islands.  St. Ninian’s is named after a small chapel which was discovered on the island, but more famously, the location at which a 16-year-old schoolboy discovered treasure which professional archaelogists had overlooked for years!  A local farmer grazes his Shetland sheep on the island.  Sadly, the peace is disturbed by a couple of four wheelers racing up and down the tombolo.

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Driving a stick shift on the ‘wrong’ side of the road, on the ‘wrong’ side of the car on these lovely 2 lane paved roads (think oil money) wasn’t quite as daunting as expected, although driving in the city would be another thing altogether.  Although most of the roads are single paved tracks, there are several passing points alongside to allow approaching traffic to press by.  Keep to the left!

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Our first full day (Sunday) started with a quick trip to one of the finest, albeit small, beaches in the Shetland Islands and it’s right here in Levenwick!  Too cold for a dip and of course we were the only ones walking the sandy beach, but no doubt in warmer weather, this would be a popular spot to play in the quiet water.

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As we made our way up from the beach, I spotted a family gathered about some sheep in a holding yard.  I pulled over quickly and went to meet them.  They kindly answered my questions about sheep production in Shetland Islands.  We really had a good chat for about an hour!  They were expecting the truck soon to load the lambs to ship to Aberdeen for finishing.  Farming is fraught with the same obstacles as American farmers.  I tried asking a few sheep farmers what grazing land sold for but they didn’t know!  It simply is not for sale.  A small lot for building a home is about  £17,000 or $27,780.  Not really out of line for a lot with stunning views of the North Sea!

Later. in the early afternoon, we made our way to Sandsayre Pier at Sandwick to meet our Mousa Boat ride to Mousa Island at which we hiked around enjoying the scenery and wildlife, as well as the highlight, the Broch of Mousa.  This is the best preserved broch in all the world.  Brochs are unique to Scotland and it is still unclear as to the purpose.  It’s only about a mile across from the main island, but today it was cloudy, hazy, windy, and quite cool.  However, we all had layered up well, so we were not uncomfortable.  We enjoyed a chat with a few people in a group of Aussies from Sydney who were our boat mates.

Later tonight, I watched Downton Abbey, months before my American friends are able.  Unfortunately, I’ll only see 3 or 4 episodes before we head back to the States which means waiting until late January – early February before watching the last of the season!

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Next day, after a good rest, we headed south towards Sumburgh Head.  The drive down the main road was stunning as usual and, as we kept hearing, the weather is unusually nice for this time of year.  Shortly before arriving at Jarlshof, part of our drive included passing across the end of the Sumburgh Airport runway.  Definitely a first for me!

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‘Jarlshof; is a made up word for Facebook 01an area near the southern coast of the main Shetland Island which has been excavated to reveal several thousands of years of generations.  Very interesting for us history buffs.

Next stop was beyond the airport and to the very end of the island at Sumburgh Lighthouse and Hotel at Sumburgh Head.

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After a good climb up to Sumburgh Head and back down, we discovered Spiggie’s Bar restaurant located inside the Spiggie Hotel and Lodges at which, we not only had a scrumptious late lunch, but discovered that the young lady who rang up our bill had spent three months in RIchmond, Missouri as an exchange student way back in 1988!  What a small world we live in!  We had a fun visit and I think she enjoyed reminiscing about her time spent in the US.  The Spiggie restaurant uses fresh caught fish and hand cut fries along with local sourced veggies for the salads.  Beef and lamb are also from locally raised sources.

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A great place to walk off some of that huge meal was at the Shetland Crofthouse Museum in Dunrossness.  This venue is another must do if you are ever in the Shetland Islands.  Free admission, though donations are accepted, this well maintained croft house, byre, shed, and water mill complete with stack of peat blocks stacked outside will make you truly appreciate our level of creature comforts.

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Except for stopping in at a local supermarket for evening snacks on the drive back to Melstadr in Levenwick, the croft house was our final venue for the day.

Tuesday is our last full day and a special stop for me was to find something lovely for Jessica which i would find at Shetland Jewellery in Weisdale.  However, first we drove up and over to Scalloway to tour the Scalloway castle and Scalloway Museum located next to one another with easy access and carpark.  Incredibly!  these venues didn’t open until 11am, so we walked down the main street and found the ‘places of interest,’ then with another half hour before opening, we opted to go sightseeing.  We headed up and around to the islands of East and West Burra which are accessed via Trondra and all connected by single lane bridges which we could drive over and wound our way to nearly the end of the islands.  Along the way, we pulled over for this picturesque landscape begging to be photographed.  Still photos sure don’t capture the breeze with bite, the warm sunshine, or the sound of crashing waves.

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As we came back towards Scalloway, we pulled in at a sign which advertised a working farm – Burland Croft Trail.  However, once we arrived, the lady landowner came over and said they really weren’t taking visitors anymore, the season was over.  Once i told her we were sheep and cattle farmers from Missouri and completely understood when she explained that they were busy with farm chores, she wouldn’t have it any other way than for us to take their tour on our own.  So we did, they have a lovely farm touching the Burland Sea Shore and across from the foundation of an ancient broch.  Afterwards, even her husband came over and we had a great chat about farming and all the challenges.  She apologised again for not being very good hosts as they were in the midst of sorting through and selecting replacement ewe lambs.  I assured her there was no reason for apology except from us for interrupting their work, but that we were mighty appreciative of the visit.  I think they enjoyed the exchange of ideas and the encouragement we received from one another.  Farming is often a thankless job and one with continual challenges.  We all agreed that if we wanted to be financially rich, we wouldn’t be farming.  But as she pointed out, there are many other ways to be rich – and so right she is!  We were meant to stop in here and meet Tommy and Mary Isbister.  This is a pasture walk – so wear appropriate footwear and enjoy Burland Croft Trail  – but it would be better for all to stop in during their regular tourist season!

Wednesday is our final day in Shetland.  Dallas and I walked to the local convenience store in Levenwick and I had only enough pounds to buy a couple Mars bars.  We ate a bit of one and saved some for Nathan who was cleaning up the room a bit.  Now with dishes done, towels piled up in the bathroom, luggage loaded, we headed out, only to get to the end of the drive and find road work being done.  However, the workmen finished in about 10 minutes.  We arrived plenty early in Lerwick to drop off the rental car, pick up our Northlink Ferry boarding passes, store our luggage, then off to town to find somewhere to get some cash which I would need to pay the taxi driver who would take us to our hotel in Orkney at 10:30 pm!  We did exchange some at the Lerwick Post Office on Commercial Street, then we spent an hour in the Shetland Museum.  It was time to head back to the docks and board.  Our ferry left spot on time at 5:30 pm with an early arrival time expected into Kirkwall, Orkney Islands of 10:30 rather than the 11:00 pm  stated time.  By the time our ship was moving past Sumbrough Head, it was dark enough that the lighthouse was already announcing the danger of its location.  Soon the Shetland Islands slipped out of sight and into our memories.