Tag Archives: hens

Egg Drop Soup

  • Home made egg drop soup:  (Tan Hua T’ang)
  • 3 cups of chicken stock broth.
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca flour (cassava)* or cornstarch
  • 2 eggs slightly beaten (farm fresh from pastured hens is best)

Heat broth and salt to boiling.  Mix cold water and tapioca flour; stir gradually into broth.  Boil and stir 1 minutes.  Slowly pour eggs into broth stirring constantly with fork, to form shreds of egg.  Remove from heat; stir slowly once or twice.

You can also make this without thickening it with the tapioca flour or cornstarch if it needs to be absolutely thin liquid.

For best medicine, you need to find a local farmer from whom you can purchase healthy pasture raised spent hens or broilers.  You may have to butcher them yourself.  Cook them down bones and all, pull off the meat bits, then throw the bones and cartilage back into the water and simmer another hour or so.  The goal is to get as much of the chondroitan out of the cartilage and minerals out of the bones and into your broth.  Once done, strain out the bones and let the broth cool.  Chicken fat is quite soft, so if you want to skim it off, you’ll eventually have to put it in the frig or other cool spot so that it will harden on the top of the broth so that you can remove it with a slotted spoon.

Buying chicken broth in the store is NOT the same product as what you are making here.

As always, find certified organic or organically raised ingredients.

This was a big hit with my father-in-law who is recovering from hernia surgery, is very weak, and really doesn’t have an appetite.

However, it’s quite good even if you aren’t sick or in recovery.

Cheers

tauna

*my friend Francoirse raises cassava in DRC!

Easy Hamburger Buns

The chooks (laying hens) practically stopped laying eggs this winter, so bread making had to be adjusted.  This super easy and relatively quick recipe is officially to make burger buns, but creativity can turn them into hot dog buns, loaf bread, or slice thin and broil with cheese and/or garlic butter or make mini-pizzas.  Cut smaller rounds for cocktail buns.  Recipe modified from the original found in the very helpful “Dining On A Dime” cookbook.

Try to use homegrown, local, or organic ingredients whenever possible. There are several search sites online to help you find sources near your home.

Easy Hamburger Buns

  • 5-6 cups flour (preferably unbleached white and/or stone ground – using 100% stone-ground can affect how high the buns rise)
  • 2 pkgs or 2 Tablespoons yeast
  • 1 cup milk (organic or local, real (raw) from cows grazing on pasture)
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup oil  ( i use olive oil if i use oil, but mostly i use home made applesauce)
  • 1/4 cup sugar (organically grown cane to avoid GMO)
  • 1 Tablespoon salt  (Real salt)
  • butter, melted  (same as milk)

Stir together 2 cups flour and yeast.  In a saucepan over medium, heat milk, water, oil, sugar, and salt to very warm (120ºF-130ºF/50ºC-55ºC).  Add liquid all at once to flour mixture  Beat until smooth (about 2 minutes) on medium speed with electric mixer or 300 strokes by hand.  Add enough additional flour to make a soft dough; mix well.  Let rest 10 minutes.  Roll out on a  well-floured surface to 1/2 inch thickness. Cut with 3-inch round cutter (or rim of glass).  Place rounds on greased baking sheets.  Let rise in warm place (80ºF/27ºC) for 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 425ºF (230ºC) and bake 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned.  Brush melted butter on the tops whilst still warm.  Make 12-20 buns.  (depending on how thick you cut them).  For burger buns, I like at least 15, otherwise it’s just more bread than one needs to make a nice sandwich.

Substitutions and ideas:

I use 1/2 cup of prepared applesauce instead of olive oil.

Add 1/2 cup of ground seeds (i’ve used chia, but flax, sesame, or hemp would likely work as well)

Try 1/2 and 1/2 with unbleached white flour and stone-ground whole wheat.

I warm the oven for about 10 minutes, then turn it off and place the buns inside to rise.  However, this slows down the process, because they need to be taken out before preheating the oven for baking.

Enjoy!

tauna