Tag Archives: broth

Both my guys are sick!

Well, buggers, both my husband and son are sick with the croupy head and coughing junk.  Dallas has had it for nearly 10 days, my husband got hit yesterday, but woke up with it already down in his lungs – he sounds bad.  If he feels bad in the morning, he’s gonna go ahead and make a doctor appointment.

Since we are nearly out of beef in the freezer and completely out of bones, I stole the big bones that were intended for the dog that i had the butcher cut from our own grass finished cow to make broth! (thankfully, i was able to get a cow booked in to the butcher on the 6th of February).

The bones are kind of big, but thankfully, they still fit in the pot.  I pack the bones in the pot and fill to 2 inches to the top of the pot.  Bring to a boil, but watch it or it will boil over and make a mess, then turn it down and let slow boil for 3-4 hours.

With tongs, carefully lift out all the bones.  I then set the entire pot outside to cool so the saturated fat will float to the top and solidify.  Yes, a little fat is good, but these bones will make a lot of fat, it’s really overwhelming in our opinion.  Once solidified, i remove it from the top and put into a tub with lid for later use.

Warm the remaining liquid.  Now, you can just eat it this way for clear broth – maybe add some salt or pepper OR what i did tonight, was to the 1 gallon of broth is one large onion chopped and sauteed in some of the beef fat, 1/2 cup dried parsley, 1/4 cup dried sage, 2 tablespoons celery salt, and about 3 cups of sliced carrots.  Slow boil until carrots are softened to however you like them, maybe 20-30 minutes.  Ready to serve.

Keep well!

tauna

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King’s Processing does a fabulous job of getting all the bits of beef off the bones, so the meat yield is quite high. However, you can see there are some bits on this that may be available after it’s cooked.
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Yup, after cooking and the meat is softened, i was able to pick up about 1 cup of beef bits. Always let those bones cool off completely before handling; they are hot and hold heat for a very long time.
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Use a couple tablespoons or so of the hardened beef fat to saute chopped onions that will be added back to the broth once softened.

Egg Drop Soup for Liquid Diet

Home made egg drop soup:  (Tan Hua T’ang)

3 cups of chicken stock broth.

1/2 teaspoon salt (use Real salt or something that is 100% salt – check the label)

3 tablespoons cold water

1 tablespoon tapioca flour (cassava)* or cornstarch

2 eggs slightly beaten (farm fresh from pastured hens is best)

Heat broth and salt to boiling.  Mix cold water and tapioca flour; stir gradually into broth.  Boil and stir 1 minutes.  Slowly pour eggs into broth stirring constantly with fork, to form shreds of egg.  Remove from heat; stir slowly once or twice.

You can also make this without thickening it with the tapioca flour or cornstarch if it needs to be absolutely thin liquid.

For best medicine, you need to find a local farmer from whom you can purchase healthy pasture raised spent hens or broilers.  You may have to butcher them yourself.  Cook them down bones and all, pull off the meat bits, then throw the bones and cartilage back into the water and simmer another hour or so.  The goal is to get as much of the chondroitan out of the cartilage and minerals out of the bones and into your broth.  Once done, strain out the bones and let the broth cool.  Chicken fat is quite soft, so if you want to skim it off, you’ll eventually have to put it in the frig or other cool spot so that it will harden on the top of the broth so that you can remove it with a slotted spoon.

Buying chicken broth in the store is NOT the same product as what you are making here.

As always, find certified organic or organically raised ingredients.

This was a big hit with my father-in-law who is recovering from hernia surgery, is very weak, and really doesn’t have an appetite.

However, it’s quite good even if you aren’t sick or in recovery.

Cheers

tauna

*my friend Francoirse raises cassava in DRC!

Find a local producer near you using a handy website search, here are a few:

Localdirt.com

Eatwild.com

Localharvest.org

 

Brown Broth for Liquid Diet

So, why the liquid diet postings – well, my father-in-law just went through terrible pain and finally surgery to pull his stomach down through his diaphragm so that it was no longer in his chest cavity!  There were a lot of problems this caused, so we all hope that he will be able to heal now.  To start, however, he is on a 2 week liquid diet, so the challenge is to provide high calorie, palatable liquids so he can gain enough strength to keep going.  Especially when he doesn’t even have an appetite.

We had just butchered a beef and i had asked the butcher to throw all the big bones in sacks for the dog, but now I’m cooking them for bone broth before letting the dog have at them.  I  pack a 3 gallon stock pot with beef bones and fill with water.  Bring to a boil (be ready because this full pot will boil over and make a mess the minute you turn your back!), then turn down the heat for a slow boil about 5 hours.

Using tongs,  I remove the bones and place in one of those big popcorn tins.  The stock will be reduced to about 8 cups.  Let this cool overnight, so that the fat that hardens on top can be removed easily.  I’m not completely sure that removing all that fat is good, so i typically leave few tablespoons.  It sure is extra calories, which are needed, but sometimes too much fat can cause indigestion and i certainly want to avoid that.

Once this stock is made, it can be used to prepare different flavors or use it as is with maybe a bit of Real salt (which has minerals) to taste.

Here’s what i added to one quart and Jerry really liked it:

8 peppercorns

1 tsp powdered or 5 whole cloves

1 bay leaf

1 tsp thyme

1 tsp powdered celery

1 tablespoon Real salt

1 large onion, quartered

Bring to boil, then turn down heat and simmer about an hour.  Strain through doubled cheesecloth into a heat proof jar.  I use a regular canning jar which makes it easy to transport up to his house.  This way, he can pour out what he wants to warm up each time he feels he can eat something.

The report this morning was that he really like this combination!

Cheers!

tauna

Note that this broth is a far cry from broth purchased in the store.  When this broth is cool, it is very gelatinous indicating its source is more than water and flavour.  Our cattle are pasture finished with no grain or antibiotics.