Tag Archives: bread

Baking Seldom A Failure

While in this case, my first two attempts following a recipe with the Sunrise Flour Mill resulted in less than desirable loaves, they were still very tasty.  Sometimes, however, baking experiments simply aren’t an enjoyable eating experience – in those cases, one can either throw them out to your pets or chooks, compost them, or whir them into excellent bread crumbs to be used in myriad of recipes.

Flat bread loaf

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Slices were a bit tough though very tasty.

Here’s what i did with the bread since it was a bit stiff.  Soak those slices in fresh farm eggs and slowly cook in butter.  Serve with local honey or maple syrup.

French toastFrench toastFrench toast

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Daily Bread Baking

Daily Bread Baking – how hard can it be?  With the right flour, it’s easy!  Tracking down non-hybridized wheat or ancient wheat varieties grown and processed in the United States without the use of unnecessary chemicals and not sprayed with glyphosate (think Roundup) at harvest is much harder than it should be.  But i found a couple sources.

The most recent and i’m very excited about this one is from Sunrise Flour Mill in North Branch, Minnesota.  Mrs. Glanville pointed out in her quick response to my question via their website that she and her husband are the millers, not growers.  Yet, her husband takes the time to visit and vet the growers from whom they purchase the Red Turkey variety of wheat they use.

Easy Heritage Yeast Bread

So, when my flour arrived, i found the above recipe and set about making the bread.  I made a loaf and it did not rise as i thought it should.  I had weighed my ingredients and had the water just right.  I broke the rules by using my Kitchenaid Mixer with dough hook for kneading.   However, the loaf was excellent taste and disappeared quickly.

Another stab at it, but i increased the yeast to 1 tsp vs 1/2 tsp like before, but this time i kneaded by hand.  Same result as before.

The third time was a charm and resulted in a stunningly attractive and delicious loaf.  I got this now.  What did i do differently?  Below is my recipe.

HERITAGE YEAST BREAD

Ingredients:

  • 3 ½ cups (1lb  or 450 g) Heritage White or Bread Blend Flour Weighing ingredients is the most accurate way to bake.
  • 1-2 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1 1/3 cup lukewarm tap water (10- 12 oz (300 G)Chlorine-Free Water 75-80 degrees F
  • 1 tbsp Active Dry Yeast

Instructions:

Mixing and Kneading

Using a large spoon or fork, stir the liquid into the flour. When all the water has been added it will be a rather sticky lump. With wet hands, knead the dough by pushing, pulling and stretching it. After kneading for a few minutes, the dough will become less sticky and wet, beginning to look like a bread dough. Go ahead and grab a bit more flour to alleviate stickiness if needed.

Proofing

Cover and let sit on the counter for 1- 2 hours. This is proofing time (the dough is rising). It will rise more quickly if the kitchen temperature is 70+F. if it is less than 70 F it will take longer which is the reason for the 1-2 hour range.

Final Proofing

Now the dough needs to be handled gently so as to not deflate it. Round it up and shape it into an oblong loaf.  Place in a bread pan that has been oiled with both butter and olive oil. Use this combination for best release. Cover the dough to keep it from drying out. Leave it on the counter and let it proof while the oven heats, about 30-45 minutes.

Baking

Preheat oven to 375 F.

Place dough in the preheated oven and bake for about 35-45 minutes.

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Mixed Grain Bread – Scottish

I have discovered my favourite bread to make!

MIXED GRAIN BREAD – SCOTLAND

Modified from Scottish Cookery Cookbook, 2010

INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 oz (about 3 cups) strong white flour
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 8 oz (about 2 cups) whole wheat flour
  • 8 oz (about 2 cups) Einkorn flour
  • 1 oz butter, diced
  • 2 teaspoon yeast
  • 1 oz (1/3 cup) rolled oats
  • 2 tablespoon sunflower seeds
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • ¾ pint warm water
  • 1 medium egg

DIRECTIONS:

Sift white flour and salt into a large bowl.  Stir in the wheat and Einkorn flours then rub in the butter until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.  Stir in the yeast, oats, and seeds then make a well in the centre.

Stir the molasses into the warm water until dissolved.  Add the molasses water to the dry ingredients.  Mix to a soft dough. (I used paddle hook on KitchenAid mixer)

Using a dough hook, knead the dough for 10 minutes until smooth and elastic.  Put in an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and leave to rise in a warm place for 1 ½ hours, or until double in size.

Preheat the oven to 425°F, 15 minutes before baking.  (I start the oven now, then do the below and leave the loaf and pan on top the stove – the warmth from the oven helps with rising, especially in winter.)

Using dough hook, knead again for a minute or two to knock out the air.  Shape into an oval loaf about 12 inches long and place on a well-oiled baking sheet.  Cover with oiled (important) plastic wrap and leave to rise for 40 minutes or until doubled in size.

Brush the loaf with beaten egg and bake in the preheated oven 35-45 minutes (mine was 35 minutes) or until the bread is well risen, browned, and sounds hollow when the base is tapped.  Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Here’s the original recipe:

Recipe - Mixed Grain Bread

French Cheese Braid (Natte)

Here’s an easy, delicious, and gorgeous recipe i tried for the first time and was pretty successful!  Taken from my old Betty Crocker International Cookbook.  When i posted it on facebook, a friend noted that it would make a great Challah bread for Shabbat and some of YHWH’s Feasts!  Unbeknowst to me at the time, the little write up for the recipe in the cookbook suggested exactly that!

French Cheese Braid

“The rich yellow dough used to make this braid (the French call it natte) is similar to the Jewish holiday bread called Challah, but somewhat richer in flavor and flecked with bits of cheese.  It is delicious as a luncheon or light supper bread served with soup and salad.”

  • 1 package active dry yeast (i use 1 tablespoon)
  • 3/4 cup warm water (105F to 115F)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Real salt
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 3 1/2 to 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 6 ounces Swiss or Gruyère cheese, shredded or diced (about 1 1/2 cups) (i use mozzarella or cheddar)
  • olive oil
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons water

Dissolve yeast in warm water in large bowl.  Stir in sugar, salt, eggs, butter, and 2 cups of the flour.  Beat until smooth.  Stir in enough remaining flour to make the dough easy to handle.

Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes. (I use my Kitchenaid mixer with a dough hook).  Place in a greased bowl; turn greased side up.  (i spray the dough and bowl with my Misto olive oil sprayer and leave the dough in the same mixing bowl).  Cover; let rise in a warm place until double, 1 to 2 hours.  Dough is ready if indentation remains when touched.  (If you can’t find a warm spot in your house, set the bowl in a bowl or pan of hot water)

Punch down dough; knead in cheese until well distributed.  Divide into 3 equal parts.  Roll each part into a rope, 15 inches long.  Place ropes together on lightly greased cookie sheet.  Braid ropes gently and loosely; do not stretch.  Pinch ends to fasten; tuck under securely.  Brush lightly with oil.  Let rise until double, 40-50 mintues.  (May have to set your sheet on top of the pan of hot water again)

Heat oven to 375F, Beat egg yolk and 2 tablespoons water slighty; brush over braid.  Place on oven rack below center of oven.  Bake until braid sounds hollow when tapped, 25 to 30 minutes.  If braid is browning too quickly, cover loosely with aluminum foil.

My experience is that this baked fully at 25 minutes and the braid needs covering at about the 18 minute mark.

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Braided before second rising
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After baking

This is perfect bread to accompany soup!

Cheers!

tauna