David Rankin, Farmer, 1906

In a recent farm magazine, a young farmer was recognised in an article as one of  America’s (United States)  best.  Lo, and behold, he is from Tarkio, Missouri and the article made mention of David Rankin, Missouri Corn King, who died in 1910, but had amassed 30,000 acres, 12,000 head of cattle, and 25,000 hogs. It was reported that he raised a million bushels of corn in a single season, much of it from a 6,000 acre field.

David Rankin, Farmer: Modern Agricultural Methods Contrasted With Primitive Agricultural Methods By The Life History Of A Plain Farmer (1909)

So, i did a quick search online about Farmer Rankin and to my delight, discovered he wrote a small book about his life and how he managed his assets to obtain such wealth.  ALthough the writing is not fancy and sometimes seems disjointed, his simple outline is a great insight into basic business management.  Some of his early income would have been taxed at a 3%-5% rate, but that income tax was rescinded in 1872.  Full on income tax didn’t come about until 1913.

But the crux of his idea, is to invest in time saving modern implements and buy land.  For a time, he was paying 17%-18% interest on money he borrowed to buy land.  Granted, he had some good hits that were just plain lucky, but not always.

You can read his short book here for free online or it can be ordered for a modest amount on Amazon.

Both my guys are sick!

Well, buggers, both my husband and son are sick with the croupy head and coughing junk.  Dallas has had it for nearly 10 days, my husband got hit yesterday, but woke up with it already down in his lungs – he sounds bad.  If he feels bad in the morning, he’s gonna go ahead and make a doctor appointment.

Since we are nearly out of beef in the freezer and completely out of bones, I stole the big bones that were intended for the dog that i had the butcher cut from our own grass finished cow to make broth! (thankfully, i was able to get a cow booked in to the butcher on the 6th of February).

The bones are kind of big, but thankfully, they still fit in the pot.  I pack the bones in the pot and fill to 2 inches to the top of the pot.  Bring to a boil, but watch it or it will boil over and make a mess, then turn it down and let slow boil for 3-4 hours.

With tongs, carefully lift out all the bones.  I then set the entire pot outside to cool so the saturated fat will float to the top and solidify.  Yes, a little fat is good, but these bones will make a lot of fat, it’s really overwhelming in our opinion.  Once solidified, i remove it from the top and put into a tub with lid for later use.

Warm the remaining liquid.  Now, you can just eat it this way for clear broth – maybe add some salt or pepper OR what i did tonight, was to the 1 gallon of broth is one large onion chopped and sauteed in some of the beef fat, 1/2 cup dried parsley, 1/4 cup dried sage, 2 tablespoons celery salt, and about 3 cups of sliced carrots.  Slow boil until carrots are softened to however you like them, maybe 20-30 minutes.  Ready to serve.

Keep well!

tauna

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King’s Processing does a fabulous job of getting all the bits of beef off the bones, so the meat yield is quite high. However, you can see there are some bits on this that may be available after it’s cooked.
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Yup, after cooking and the meat is softened, i was able to pick up about 1 cup of beef bits. Always let those bones cool off completely before handling; they are hot and hold heat for a very long time.
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Use a couple tablespoons or so of the hardened beef fat to saute chopped onions that will be added back to the broth once softened.

Diá Cero: Sick in Spain

He made it! Still sick, though – buggers…..

Enter Wonderland

8:08 am, touchdown in Madrid. After ~12 hours of flight it’s good to put my Chuck’s on solid ground again. Lydia, our coordinator, and Karla, another team member at En Vivo, pick Rachel and I up from the airport. We eat the traditional Spanish lunch of *ahem* pizza and calzones *ahem* for our first meal in Spain, then go to a small coffee chain before hitting the road for Salamanca.

I sleep most of the way there and wake up with un garganta that feels like it went 9 rounds in the boxing ring. Karla drops us off at Rachel’s apartment, then the blitz begins.

Stay awake, beat jet lag. Say “ciao”, not “hola”. Doors lock behind you. Once out opens, twice in double locks. If a car is coming as you cross the street, go, they will yield.

I’m shivering.

Welcome to the plaza. You’ll look like tourists, but…

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Effects of E+ Fescue

Symptoms of ergovaline poisoning in livestock are:

  1.  decreased milk production (as much as 45% reduction!)
  2. poor body condition
  3. general poor health
  4. decreased weight gain (stocker gains can be halved!)
  5. delayed hair coat shedding
  6. low conception rate
  7. low birth weight
  8. circulatory problems (ie: ear tips freezing, sloughing off of tail switch, even so far as to slough off hooves)
  9. lameness
  10. loss of appetite
  11. abortions
  12. poor circulation also leads to inability to dissipate body heat (especially troublesome in the heat and humidity of summer) (this is the main problem which leads to the above symptoms)

The cause is that the fungus is a vaso constricting substance called ergovaline.  A good explanation comes from Endophyte Service Laboratory, College of Agriculture Sciences
Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 USA.

The toxin ergovaline is a vaso-constrictor, it constricts the blood vessels and reduces blood circulation to the outer parts of the animal’s body. Animals that have consumed a toxic dose of ergovaline will have difficulty regulating body temperature. The constriction of blood flow also can cause “fescue foot”. Fescue foot is characterized by gangrene or tissue death in the legs, ears and tails.

Recent research done by Matt Booher, Crop and Soil Agent at Virginia Coopoerative Extension and John Benner indicates that despite our best efforts, endophyte infected fescue at all stages of growth causes some level of poisoning to livestock.

Seems mind boggling that we farmers and ranchers continue to allow this non-native plant to be grazed by our stock, doesn’t it!?  Tannachton Farm is on a mission to remove it.  It will be a fight since the grass is allelopathic and persistent!

 

Cheers!

tauna

Salamanca: One Day More

I take Nathan to Kansas City airport in the morning. Will i cry? yup, can’t help that, but i’m excited and thrilled at his hard earned opportunity.

 

Enter Wonderland

“Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.”

– Matthew 6:34, NIV

“One day more! Another day, another destiny. This never-ending road to Calvary.”

Jean Valjean, Les Miserables


Sometimes I wonder if this icestorm isn’t a godsend. I would probably be much more stressed about leaving for another country if we weren’t blockaded by horrific weather. Instead, I’ve been worrying about whether or not I’ll be ableto leave.

All kidding aside, people often ask if I’m scared or excited for this semester, and since I hate to disappoint, I feed both their vicarious travel dreams and inate fear of the unknown by saying, “both, really.” The more accurate, but far less interesting answer would be neither. Although I am a worrier, I worry about things right in front of me: where’s my next turn to…

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Can Love Confront?

Enter Wonderland

Today’s post is a little different from the others, as I share a passage from Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s book, Life Together. The reading is from Chapter 4: Ministry.  Although it is very dry, it’s an excellent read, one that certainly challenges my perception of Christian fellowship.  I would recommend it for anyone looking to understand common devotions or seeking ways to improve personal devotions.  Available on Amazon.


The speaking of that Word is beset with infinite perils.  If it is not accompanied by worthy listening, how can it really be the right word for the other person?  If it is contradicted by one’s own lack of active helpfulness, how can it be a convincing and sincere word?  If it issues, not from a spirit of bearing and forbearing, but from impatience and the desire to force its acceptance, how can it be the liberating and healing word?

Moreover, the person who…

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Which Flag Do You Wave? — Enter Wonderland

“You carry two flags. Over one shoulder is the American flag, over the other is the Christian flag. Which do you wave?” – Dr. Alan Kemper A few weeks ago, my best friend and his older sister were arguing about whether immigrants should be expected to assimilate to American culture. The debate was well-fought […]

via Which Flag Do You Wave? — Enter Wonderland