Garlic Burger Buns from the American Queen

Dallas and Nathan traveled with Aunt June Lamme eight years ago on the American Queen Steamboat down the Ohio River.  Nathan thoughtfully purchased a cookbook from the ship’s cook for me and one of the best burger buns is my go-to.  From Kathy Casey‘s cookbook, Kathy Casey Cooks – Favorites.

Garlic Burger Buns

Makes 6 buns

  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1/3 cup warm water (90°F to 110°F)
  • 1 package dry yeast (2 1/4 tsp)
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp finely minced garlic
  • Coarse ground salt for sprinkling

In a small bowl stir together the milk, olive, oil, sugar, warm water, and yeast.  Stir to dissolve yeast and let sit about 10 minutes then pour into a large mixer bowl.

Whisk the eggs in a small bowl and add all but 1 tbsp. to the liquid ingredients, reserving the extra for brushing the bun tops.  Mix in flour, salt, and garlic with paddle attachment until incorporated and then change to a dough hook.  Mix with dough hook on medium speed for about 3 to 4 minutes, as needed, to make a smooth, moist dough.  Knead until smooth.  Place in a large greased bowl, cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 1/2 hours.

Punch down and divide dough into 6 pieces.  Roll into balls and let rest 10 minutes covered with a towel.  With a well-floured rolling pin, roll balls into 4-inch rounds.  Place on a greased baking sheet.  Cover lightly with a towel and let rise until almost doubled.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F.

In a small bowl, whisk remaining egg together with 1/2 tbsp water.  Brush the tops of the buns lightly with egg wash, sprinkle lightly with coarse ground salt and place in oven.

Bake about 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown.  Cool buns on a rack.

That’s the recipe, but i usually make 8 buns with this recipe since they are rather large.  They also need to be eaten fresh or they tend to become crumbly.  I use lovely Hebridean Sea Salt flakes harvested from the shores of the remote Scottish Hebridean Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.

Continuing Rain!

Here in north-central Missouri we’ve continued to stay rainy and muddy since winter.  However, we cannot complain compared to the horrific flooding, damaging thunderstorms, tornadoes, tropical storms, and continuing droughts and wildfires other parts of the country and world are receiving.  It’s been hard on equipment, livestock, and people, but maybe someday it’ll change and become ‘normal.’  We wear mud boots everyday all day despite 107ºF heat indices on some days and terrific humidity even when it’s in the 80s and pretty sure i’m starting to get foot rot!  Gonna switch to 100% wool socks pretty quick if we don’t get relief soon.  Any socks with nylon or such in them cause my feet to sweat and peel – kind of gross for sure.

We keep a good supply of coconut water in the cupboard and frig for rehydrating when water just won’t quite supply enough minerals.  Bananas and buffered salt are on hand as well to help with muscle cramping at night.

We’ve weaned the fall calves, doctored a good number for bad eyes (pinkeye) already, and sorted off two loads of calves to sell at North Missouri Livestock Auction the 6th of July.  The mud and rain has prevented us from establishing summer annual pastures that we had planned to graze and grow out some of yearlings this year.  Since we didn’t get that done, we are running out of grass, so the calves need to go where ever grass is available.

Tough on calving, but the cows and calves are really doing quite well despite the heat and rain.  A couple of calves lost due to navel ill because of them lying in a muddy spot and allowing infection to develop.  There is little help for a calf once it gets navel ill.  We always lose some baby calves and this year really hasn’t been any worse in that regard.  However, what I call ‘jungle rot‘ is on the increase.  It is likely more calves will not survive if we don’t get some dry weather soon.

The ewes are pretty much done lambing and in the timber now which not only helps keep them cool and not sunburnt, but, by their grazing choices, they are helping control the brush which needs taming!  Pretty hard on wool sheep all this rain and mud.  Constantly wet wool on a live animal can be conducive to parasites that can kill the sheep.  Usually not, but any animal with a compromised immune system is susceptible.

Shabbat Shalom!

tauna

Nathan’s Graduation!

Our youngest has graduated from high school.  He has plenty of credits to do so and has managed Summa Cum Laude status with a 4.0 GPA, including, his nine hours of dual credit college courses in College Algebra, Psychology, and English Writing course via internet with North Central Missouri College at Trenton.  He has only a few modules and a couple of lab projects to complete for Physics and his mom is insisting on finishing Human (advanced) Biology (both Apologia courses, but this curriculum has changed hands since we purchased).

Sunday afternoon (7 June) is the big day of visiting and thanking friends and supporters of his 12 year home education career.  I’ll have some old photos displayed and we’ll grill some beef dogs and burgers along with picnic type food.  It’s planned for outdoors at our house, so hope the weather allows.

In preparation, the house needs spring cleaning top to bottom.  Though I have a good start, only one room is completed, and that is daughter Jessica’s room.  She is scheduled to arrive at Kansas City airport Friday night having completed her 2-year contract of teaching Kindergarten at The American School of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.  We haven’t seen her in person since October!  Thank Yah for Skype and all the modern technology which allows family and friends to keep in touch.

So, the windows are shined inside and out, sills and sashes washed, wood frames, furniture, floors, floor trim, doors are all washed and dusted.  Bedclothes are washed and in order, chandelier polished.  Next room…..

With dear Pierrette too far away to help me with this massive undertaking (yes, it is a big job for me – i’d rather be building fence than cleaning house!), I’m grateful my husband has freed up our sons and Rick Tate a bit to help me not get too far behind in my farm work.  It seems they, too, are likeminded about house cleaning!  😉

Cheers!

tauna