Summer Jobs

“…there is value in recalling the grit and glory of traditional summer work, which has taught generations of teenagers important lessons about life, labor, and even their place in the universe — which turned out to be nowhere as close to the the center as we had imagined.”

Dave Shiflett as quoted from the article “Get A (Real) Summer Job” in the Saturday/Sunday, April 25-26, 2015 Wall Street Journal Review Section.

Daughter, Jessica, working girl!
Daughter, Jessica, working girl!
Sons, Nathan and Dallas, attaching a log chain to an old silo that is to be pulled down.
Sons, Nathan and Dallas, attaching a log chain to an old silo that is to be pulled down.
Christian Finck and Nathan Powell removing and repairing old corral as well as cleaning up and burning rubbish.  Hot job!
Christian Finck and Nathan Powell removing and repairing old corral as well as cleaning up and burning rubbish. Hot job!
Christian chopping out the side of an old self feeder to help get the fire burning.
Christian chopping out the side of an old self feeder to help get the fire burning.
Christian and Dallas burning rubbish and moving panels to set up larger corral.
Christian and Dallas burning rubbish and moving panels to set up larger corral.

ANZAC 100th Anniversary 

Mon Ange


 

Good Day, Beautiful People!

25th April 2015 we honour the service men and women for protecting our country!  We also stop and pay tribute to the fallen diggers for their sacrifice in different venues all over Australia, Gallipoll and most part of the world. Lest we forget! 

 

For the fallen
With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the…

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The Kosher Animal Rap… Love this!

Toe tapping biblical wisdom!  Click on the ‘view original to get the video.  I haven’t paid to have video available on wordpress!  I think that’s why it won’t play.

natsab

Friend, Bill Sanford, of Messianic Alef Tav Scriptures, sent this out earlier today prompting a terrific conversation he and I had…  What a blessing, but that is another story.

Anyway, we have already enjoyed this rap here a couple times today…  May you be blessed by it.

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Hanging in the Wind!

One of my best investments is the Hills Drymaster 42 rotary clothesline I purchased 10 years ago after admiring them in all the backyards of Australia. Cost about the same (less now) as an electric dryer, but we can only use it about 6-8 months of the year, but line dried clothing and sheets are such treats.  Find them at Breeze Dryer.
Last May (2014) Nathan and Allen re-installed my Hills rotary clothesline. SO glad for that. The pole is set in concrete, but they had dug the chunk of concrete which contained the receiving end for the pole from the lawn of the Lamme house, then hand dug a hole by the northeast corner of the Young farm house (formerly Powell’s Country Guest House) where we now live. I purchased this Hill’s rotary clothesline after our return from Australia in March of 2005 because EVERYONE had them over there and they are so efficient. However, the heavy duty ones used there were not available in the US, so I purchased this lighter duty one from an outfit in Canada via paypal – that was the first time I’d used Paypal. (Funny, the things our minds remember, eh?) In only a couple of years, the small plastic snap which held the ‘arms’ up and out broke and for years, I just had a gnarly piece of wire holding it up, albeit not tightly. Dallas helped me drill a hole underneath the collar and through the pole, so I could insert a 5/16ths by 2 ¼ inch PTO locking pin. Should have done this years ago. Works like new now!

I was dumping about 12 gallons of water a day from our basement dehumidifier largely because of running the dryer so much (it simply vents into the basement) and could still not get the humidity level below 55%. Works fine in the winter since we need the humidity, but springtime and summertime humidity can quickly overwhelm a basement and coats and valuables start moulding because of high humidity! With the rotary clothesline up, now I hang out all the clothes and rarely run the dryer and, as long as we keep the dehumidifier running, the humidity level is dropping already to about 43% – hope to level off about 37%.

miscellaneous 006 - Copy

The Drymaster 42 is no longer made, but there are newer models now and they can be purchased in the US. I had to purchase mine out of Canada. It is not the heavy duty model found in Australia, but it serves the purpose well. I see now that the prices have come down which is a pleasant surprise!

The little orange latch broke years ago so I repaired it by drilling a hole through the post and then using this pin to hold the rotary clothesline in the upright position.
The little orange latch broke years ago so I repaired it by drilling a hole through the post and then using this pin to hold the rotary clothesline in the upright position.
Stormy or super windy weather is a good time to fold it up.  This can really get to spinning if the wind is whipping around.
Stormy or super windy weather is a good time to fold it up. This can really get to spinning if the wind is whipping around.

Just discovered that today is National Hanging Out Day.  Way too windy, rainy, and stormy here, but maybe later this week!

Cheers!

tauna

The Conundrum With Brand Loyalty

Great information and thoughts! Thank you Humble Bee Farms.

HUMBLE BEE FARMS

Elysian_Brewing_Capitol_Hill_01

Recently Elysian Brewery, a Seattle favorite craft beer company, announced it’s sale to Anheuser-Busch. The backlash was swift. Seattleites may be know for their passive-aggressive, sometimes aloof attitude. But we are also fiercely loyal to the plethora of local, small-mid size companies that dot the landscape of the Seattle scene.

So as I’m listening to the story on the Radio I find myself scoffing when one of the brewery’s original founders attempted to assure locals that the beer and brand would remain the same. That’s not the point!!!!  – I’m now yelling at my radio. The poor kids stopped next to me at the traffic light must surely think I’m crazy. I continue undaunted – No, you idiot, it’s not the same! It can’t be the same! It will never be the same!

What is the point? The point is Elysian Brewery simply will never be the same (I…

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Shetland Bus

Hey guys!  Once again, it’s Nathan, guest writing here as I’m too lazy to make my own blog.  Today we have an effect essay I wrote analyzing the effect of the Shetland Bus on the Norwegian Campaign in WWII (roll credits).  With just one more paper to write and one sitting in the queue, we have nearly reached the end of my planned contributions to the blog, but never fear, I plan to continue writing throughout the summer, though less frequently.  As always, enjoy, and please feel free to leave your thoughts and comments below.  Thanks!

On June 9, 1940, after 62 days of fighting, Norwegian forces surrendered to their German invaders and the Norwegian monarchy was forced into exile in Great Britain.  This was only the beginning of the resistance in Norway as the remaining armed forces, with Allied support, carried out a guerrilla campaign against the German occupation for the next 5 years.  In December of 1940, the Secret Intelligence Service and the Special Operations Executive sent Major L.H. Mitchell to the Shetland Islands to arrange a system to deliver supplies and men to the Norwegian resistance.  Named Operation Shetland Bus, this system’s brave volunteers had a strong effect on the Norwegian campaign by shuttling refugees, spies, and munitions between the Shetland Islands and the resistance forces in Norway, and serving as a symbol of hope to the Norwegians still under Nazi rule.

Aksel, one of the first fishing boats used during Operation Shetland Bus
Aksel, one of the first fishing boats used during Operation Shetland Bus

One of the ways in which Operation Shetland Bus affected the campaign was by helping fugitives running from German arrest escape to safety in Great Britain.  Many Norwegians had already fled for Great Britain by the time their government capitulated, and as author Brenda Ralph Lewis notes, “These refugee Norwegians proved an ideal source of recruiting for the arduous undertakings Operation Shetland Bus was going to involve” (Lewis 20).   The ships of Operation Shetland Bus would often sail at night in the winter, braving choppy seas to deliver their precious cargoes, Norwegian citizens fleeing the Gestapo, and the experience of these Norwegian fishermen proved invaluable in navigating the dangerous waters.  Despite tremendous odds and the ever-present danger of being intercepted by German warships, over the course of the war more than 350 refugees would be rescued and transplanted in Shetland, many of whom would find a way to contribute back to the war effort.

Operation Shetland Bus also affected the campaign by aiding Allied espionage in the region, establishing radio transmitters, and landing agents in Norway.  In fact, on August 30, 1941, the operation’s first mission was completed by the Aksel, a fishing ship recruited for the service, when they successfully landed an agent carrying information for the local resistance corps in Bergen, Norway (Lewis 20).  These agents relayed information which allowed for large-scale coordination of resistance activities throughout Norway, and by ferrying these agents back and forth across the stormy North Sea, Operation Shetland Bus served as a vital link between the resistance forces and their exiled monarchy.  Operation Shetland Bus would eventually deliver 60 radio transmitters and nearly 200 agents who would establish a network that sent a continuous flow of information about German movements back to Great Britain.

The most obvious effect Operation Shetland Bus had was the way in which the munitions they delivered were used.  According to Lewis, by the end of the war, almost 400 tons of munitions had been landed, much of which was carried in the holds of the so-called “buses”(fishing ships requisitioned by the operation for their ability to blend in with common fishermen) which could carry as much as 10 tons of explosives at a time (Lewis 20).  With these munitions, resistance forces were able to raid strategic targets and sabotage German efforts, such as the strike on the heavy water plant at Vemork, in which Norwegian commandos were able to destroy both the facility and the entire stockpile of heavy water, which is used in the creation of atomic weapons.  Although there were no major battles during the conflict, Allied and Norwegian commandos and saboteurs also raided German installations along the vast Norwegian coastline and destroyed German ships and supplies throughout the war.

Perhaps, however, the most important effect of Operation Shetland Bus was the hope it inspired in the Norwegian citizens.  It was a beacon for partisans and patriots, giving them a cause to which they could rally, and rally they did.  From circulating an underground newspaper filled with transcribed Allied radio broadcasts to wearing paper clips to show that they were bound together, the entire Norwegian people flocked to the cause of their nation’s freedom and that of their exiled government, and in the process, they denied the legitimacy of the puppet government established by Vidkun Quisling.  The Germans issued severe reprisals for the action of the resistance, but the limited number of Norwegian collaborators hampered these efforts to break the spirit of the Norwegian citizenry.

Operation Shetland Bus ran until May of 1945 and its ships sailed 90,000 miles over the course of their service (Lewis 20).  Despite brutal odds, Norwegian sailors and Shetland civilians continued to contribute to the war and eventually, on June 7, 1945, King Haakon VII of Norway landed in Oslo, five years to the day since the German invasion forced him from his throne.  Thanks to the efforts of the brave individuals involved with Operation Shetland Bus, the Norwegian resistance was never repressed, and their rightful government never deposed.

Works Cited

. “Operation Shetland Bus ferried spies, supplies and refugees to and from Norway under the Germans’ noses.” World War II Jul. 99: 20. Print.

Shetland Bus Memorial.  These pictures were kindly sent to be by David W. Earl, who took the pics himself. The long, narrow plaque says "The Shetland Bus 1940-1945". The small plaques have the inscription "Alt for Norge" (All for Norway), with some names of casualties underneath. I'm unable to read the names on the picture on the left (see external link below), but the picture on the right has the following: Harald Dye, Arthur Byrknes, Nils Horgen, Olav. L. Kinn, Olav Melkevik, Ole Strandkleiv, Kåre Støbakvik (all from Sandøy I), Bård O. Grotle, Schander Berg, Ivar L. Brekke, and Tore Frøysa (boat's name for the latter 4 was Aksel). The oldest was 27, while most of them were in their early to mid 20's, except for O. Strandkleiv, who was 19. All of them died in 1942. The plaque next to it has 12 more names, for whom the boat also looks like Aksel.
Shetland Bus Memorial. Photo by David W. Earl.  The long, narrow plaque says “The Shetland Bus 1940-1945”. The small plaques have the inscription “Alt for Norge” (All for Norway), with some names of casualties underneath.  Harald Dye, Arthur Byrknes, Nils Horgen, Olav. L. Kinn, Olav Melkevik, Ole Strandkleiv, Kåre Støbakvik (all from Sandøy I), Bård O. Grotle, Schander Berg, Ivar L. Brekke, and Tore Frøysa (boat’s name for the latter 4 was Aksel). The oldest was 27, while most of them were in their early to mid 20’s, except for O. Strandkleiv, who was 19. All of them died in 1942. The plaque next to it has 12 more names, for whom the boat also looks like Aksel.

Blog note: We learnt about the Shetland Bus whilst visiting the Scalloway Museum in Scalloway, Shetland Islands, Scotland.  We highly recommend this first rate museum!

More information at the Shetland Bus website.

Help from America:  In the autumn of 1943 the Shetland bus operation received a major boost in the form of the arrival of three small American ‘sub-chasers’ (submarine chasers). They were named the HESSA, HITRA and VIGRA and were under the command of Petter Saelen, Ingvald Eidsheim and Leif Larsen. Each boat had a crew of 26 men, of whom three were officers. They were fast and efficient.